Cell Biology Faculty

The Department of Cell Biology at Yale Medical School has, since its inception in 1974, been exceptionally active and well-recognized both in education and in research.  While the original research focus on cellular membranes and their functions remains strong, the department has also expanded its focus significantly in recent years. Our department currently includes major activities in neurobiology, developmental biology, nuclear structure and dynamics, the cytoskeleton, cellular imaging, structural biology, molecular biology and molecular medicine. By pooling together the broad expertise available at Yale with the specific strengths of its own faculty, the Department offers graduate and medical students broad and comprehensive training.

Faculty Listing by Research Interests

  • Cell Biology of RNA Faculty
    RNA molecules play critical and diverse roles in a staggering number of cellular processes. Processes of particular interest in the department include determining how cells recognize and handle defective RNAs, how RNA-binding proteins recognize their RNA targets, how mRNAs are localized to discrete regions of cells and how small noncoding RNAs influence gene expression, cell function, and stem cell biology. More...
  • Cellular Imaging and Biophysics Faculty
    Macromolecular crystallography, in combination with other biophysical and biochemical techniques, is the most powerful tool currently available for obtaining the high resolution information necessary to understand the details of the macromolecular interactions governing cell life. Shortly after research groups within the department identify which interactions are important, efforts to visualize critical macromolecular complexes begin. More...
  • Cytoskeletal Dynamics Faculty
    The cytoskeleton is a fundamental component of all eukaryotic cells. From cell division to membrane trafficking to cell polarity, the cytoskeleton provides the structural framework and force upon which these critical cellular events rely. More...
  • Developmental and Neuronal Cell Biology Faculty
    The core problem in developmental biology is how spatial asymmetry is established to enable single cells to form complex tissues and entire organisms. Spatial asymmetry in development originates in the ability of a progenitor cell, a fertilized egg or stem cell, to produce two daughter cells with different cell fates. The mechanisms important for such cellular asymmetry is the focus of several labs in the department studying stem cells and their seemingly inexhaustible capacity for self-renewal and differentiation, or investigating how the egg itself is constructed during oogenesis. More...
  • Dynamics and Organization of the Nucleus Faculty
    The compartmentalization of genetic information within the nucleus of eukaryotes promoted the evolution of diverse mechanisms for regulating gene expression and genome stability. Simultaneously, cellular machineries arose to control molecular communication between the cytoplasm and nucleus. The department is actively engaged in examining these diverse mechanisms at both the molecular and organismal level. More...
  • Host Pathogen Interactions Faculty
    Understanding how the immune system mounts an effective but highly regulated response to foreign pathogens is essentially a problem in systems cell biology. Individual cells, such as T lymphocytes, dendritic cells, and B lymphocytes, must carry out a series of complex tasks individually. More...
  • Membrane Trafficking Faculty
    Yale has a long history studying membrane traffic, starting with the pioneering studies of George Palade and colleagues, during the '60's and '70's, which laid the foundation for our understanding of the pathway of regulated secretion. The route map was derived by combining biochemical and microscopic approaches. More...